In January, the students have begun a civil right unit and as part of this unit the students will read the book A Strong Right Arm, a biography on Mamie "Peanut" Johnson. In preparation for this the students explored some of the different Negro League players and made a plaque. Here is their work:
(All work is student edited)
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DSC_0738_0056_edited-1

Toni Stone


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DSC_0735_0053_edited-1

Willie Mays
Willie was born in 1931. When he was 16 he started semiprofessional baseball and played for the barons. Next Willie played with the Giants. Willie led baseball in homers from 1955-65. In his carrier he hit 660 home runs and his batting average was .302! Willie was known for his terrific catches, leaping and diving everywhere. He was traded to the Mets and then ended his hall of fame career.

By Marianne Hanasalik


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DSC_0732_0050_edited-1

Josh Gibson
Born Dec. 21, 1911
He was one of the best Negro baseball player the world has ever seen. He is credited with smashing a fair ball out of Yankee Stadium and was elected to Major League Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972. Josh hit 962 home runs against all competition in his 17 year career. Gibson's greatness in the major leagues was legendary. Belting home runs of more than 500 feet was common for him.
By Harrison Palmer



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Hank Aaron
In 1934, the “The Greatest Home Run Hitter” was born. His career began with the Negro Leagues, and then in 1954 Hank was transferred to the Major Leagues. He beat Babe Ruth’s record of 715 home runs. In 1957 Hank led the league in RBIs and was MVP. He was elected to the Hall Of Fame in 1982. His career was 24 years long.



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Smokey Joe Williams
Smokey Joe Williams
Played for 27 years
Born April 6, 1886, he grew to stand 6-foot-4 and weighed 200 pounds. Playing pitcher, first baseman, outfielder, he earned the nicknames “strike out” and “cyclone in the Negro leagues. Playing for eight teams, his best years were with the Grays and N.Y. Giants. Ty Cobb thought him a “sure thirty game winner,” and he compiled a 41-3 mark in 1914. He was elected into the Hall of Fame. Death is unknown.
By Jack Greene


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DSC_0726_0044_edited-1

Buck Leonard
Born 1907-1997

Buck played with the Grays. He started playing in 1933-1950. Throughout his career he had a never-ending love of the game. Buck was a great hitter and a great first baseman. When he was on the team, they won nine games in a row. In 1940 he was crowned batting title champion. This lefty hitter swung at warp speed. In one year Buck made $10,000. This is the saga of Buck Leonard baseball career.
By, Elyssa Anneser


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Monte Irwin
Monte Irvin
1937 - 1948
Monte Irvin was one of the first black baseball players and one of the best. At the age of 18, he joined the Newark Eagles. Some people thought that he could do anything. Outfield and shortstop were his positions because he had a great arm. His manager wanted someone who could hit the ball over the fence; he was good at that, too. He was the best at everything.
By Brianna Senft


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Cool Papa Bell


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DSC_0719_0037_edited-1


Leon Day
1934-1950
Leon Day was very good at hitting, pitching and a speedy base runner. With a batting average of .353, he was feared as a hitter. He played on four teams, the Eagles naming him the “best pitcher”. In 21 1/3 innings he made 16 strike outs and the first Opening Day no-hitter in the Negro leagues. He was elected into the Hall of Fame in 1995 with a winning percentage of .708.

By McKenna Cisler

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Ray Dandridge
Ray Dandridge
1933 - 1945
Ray Dandridge played from 1933 to 1945 and was the best third baseman that was in any league. He had a lifetime batting average of .311 and finished his career third in stolen bases. He played on about 5 teams but only two of those teams lead him into the Mexican and Baseball Hall of Fame. Ray Dandridge was legendary defender on third base.
By Garrett Shost


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DSC_0714_0032_edited-1

Ben Taylor